Category Archives: Software

Predixion Software Raises $20 Million in Series C Financing

SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA–(Marketwired – Jul 8, 2013) -Predixion Software, a developer of collaborative predictive analytics solutions, announced today it has raised $20 million in Series C financing. Predixion’s Series C includes two new strategic investors, Accenture (NYSE: ACN) and GE Ventures. Current investors DFJ Frontier, EMC, Miramar Venture Partners and Palomar Ventures also subscribed to the round of financing along with new investor, Frost Venture Partners.

In conjunction with its role in leading the financing round, Accenture will jointly develop a range of advanced analytics solutions for its clients with Predixion. These solutions will reduce the time and cost of decision making by extending the use of predictive analytics applications to managers in a range of business functions, allowing them to apply data-driven insights directly to their operational workflows. The solutions will be marketed to Accenture clients.

“We are pleased to join forces with Predixion Software to offer our clients’ business users new intuitive data analytics and collaboration solutions,” said Sajid Usman, global managing director for Technology at Accenture Analytics. “The end-to-end capabilities we’re building will make it more cost effective for our clients to turn data into insights, actions, and ultimately business outcomes. Our investment in Predixion is part of our ongoing strategy of bringing capabilities to our clients that cover the full analytics value chain and help them move forward on their Analytics Journey to ROI.”

Predixion provides collaborative predictive analytics solutions for customers across key industries such as healthcare, life sciences, financial services, marketing, government, manufacturing and ecommerce. Predixion software eliminates the complexity of predictive analytics so non-technical professionals on the front lines of business can anticipate customer needs, reduce costs and accelerate operational efficiency. For example, a healthcare administrator can predict which patients are likely to readmit, a bank manager can anticipate when a valuable customer is likely to switch banks, or a marketing manager can use predictive targeting to improve campaign response rates.

The company’s recent milestones include starting the year with six new strategic customers, revenue growth of over 800%, on average, for 2011 and 2012 as well as closing Q1 2013 revenue that exceeded all of 2012 revenue by 30%. Predixion was also selected as a finalist for Red Herring’s Top 100 North America award, a prestigious list honoring the year’s most promising private technology ventures from the North American business region.

“Bringing on world-class investors like Accenture and GE validates the massive opportunity for nimble predictive analytics technologies,” said Simon Arkell, CEO and Co-Founder, Predixion Software. “Partnering with such an experienced group of strategics will help us accelerate growth and scale globally as we continue our mission to drive adoption of predictive analytics into every industry.”

“From aviation to health care, GE’s customers are now collecting unprecedented amounts of data, due to a growing number of intelligent business systems and sensor-equipped machines,” said Brett May, Head of Software Ventures and Business Development, GE Software. “GE plans to launch many next-generation Industrial Internet services that leverage that data and its context. We believe that Predixion will broaden the spectrum of creators and consumers of big data predictive analytics and we’re excited about the company’s potential to help us offer data-driven value to our customers.”

Predixion will use the funding proceeds to accelerate product development and scale its sales and marketing organizations to support current and anticipated demand and growth for its family of predictive analytics solutions.

About Predixion Software
Predixion Software is a disruptive predictive analytics software company with a unique focus on the development of portable predictive applications via its patent pending “Machine Learning Semantic Model” (MLSM) and the “last mile” of analytics — the deployment of powerful predictions to the people who need to act upon them. Predixion offers an easy-to-deploy self-service predictive analytics solution that allows customers to unlock deep insights within their data with technology that integrates with leading business intelligence platforms, business applications and workflows.

TSP Symposium 2013 Keynotes to Focus on Quality Practices for Critical Software

The Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has announced the slate of software engineering thought-leaders who will serve as keynote speakers for the Team Software Process (TSP) Symposium 2013. Held in Dallas, Texas, on September 16-19, the TSP Symposium 2013 keynote line-up includes Bill Curtis, senior vice president and chief scientist with Cast Software; Enrique Ibarra, senior vice president of technology of the Mexican Stock Exchange (BMV); and Robert Behler, chief operating officer of the SEI.

The symposium theme, When Software Really Matters, explores the idea that when product quality is critical, high-quality practices are the best way to achieve it.

“When a software system absolutely must work correctly, quality must be built in from the start. A disciplined approach to quality also offers the benefit of lower lifecycle costs. The TSP promotes the application of practices that lead to superior, high-quality products,” said James McHale, TSP Symposium 2013 technical chair. “Our keynote speakers and representatives from industry and government organizations from around the world will share how using TSP helps organizations build quality in from the start when there’s no room for error.”

  • Curtis will assert that the stakes for software-caused operational problems are now larger than ever, approaching a half-billion dollars per incident. Every other aspect of the business is managed by numbers, including IT operations. Software lags behind, however, because the culture of craftsmanship still prevails. Curtis’s talk will challenge that culture: Quality measurement will be challenged for under-measuring non-functional, structural quality, the cause of many operational disasters. Productivity measurement will be challenged for not penalizing baselines when rework is shifted into future releases as technical debt. Software measurement will be challenged to better express outcomes in terms that justify investments for improving quality. The word “quality” will be challenged as the wrong way to frame the argument. Curtis will propose a measurement stack or measurement pyramid to help translate software numbers to business numbers. At the foundation of this pyramid are the Personal Software Process (PSP) and TSP.
  • Ibarra will detail the Mexican Stock Exchange’s (BMV) broad plan of technological renovation that included migration to a new state-of-the-art data center and creating new operational systems with better functionalities and quality attributes. Since 2005, the BMV, which is responsible for operating the cash and derivatives market of the country and is the only exchange in Mexico, has faced the constant challenge of accommodating an exponential growth of demand for its transactional services as well as pressure from the market to offer services with better response times and functionalities. One of the most challenging software projects included in this technological renovation plan was the redesign and construction of the operational system known as the trading engine, which has strict and ambitious requirements for speed (latency), scalability, and continuous availability. The new system, which was to be designed and built internally, and the project were called MoNeT. The BMV had two goals for MoNeT: making sure a carefully considered and reviewed system architecture was in place prior to building the system and adopting a software development process that maximizes the quality of the new system and ensures that it complies with its intended quality attributes. Ibarra will describe the most relevant aspects of the MoNeT project, its performance in production, and the business impact it had on the BMV.
  • Behler, one of only 139 individuals qualified as pilots of the Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird aircraft, will describe his experience flying the fastest, most physically demanding aircraft in the world to gather vital data during the Cold War and the teamwork approach it took to develop the aircraft. The SR-71 was developed in the 1960s with myriad sophisticated sensors used to acquire highly specific intelligence data. The aircraft remains an icon of American aerospace engineering to this day and is considered to be the most effective reconnaissance aircraft in history.

In addition to the keynote speakers, substantial technical program, and organized networking events, the TSP Symposium 2013 also offers practitioners an in-depth learning opportunity with full-day tutorials on introductory and advanced TSP concepts.

“I am very excited about this year’s lineup of keynote speakers and technical presenters. The symposium should be stimulating with presentations on a broad array of topics related to quality-focused software development. It is also an excellent way for participants to network and exchange diverse ideas about how they have used the PSP/TSP approach to achieve their software quality goals,” said Mark Kasunic, Symposium co-chair.

SOA Software Announces API Management for DataPower

SOA Software, a leading provider of API Management that helps businesses plan, build, secure, monitor and share APIs, announced today API Management for the IBM WebSphere DataPower family of SOA appliances. The new solution manages the full lifecycle of DataPower-based APIs and extends the capabilities of the widely deployed SOA Software Integrated Governance Solution for IBM DataPower.

This unified approach to managing both APIs and services extends the capabilities of DataPower infrastructure, enabling mobile and web solutions for internal mainframe and WebSphere MQ based services. SOA Software’s API Gateway, Lifecycle Manager for APIs and Community Manager have been integrated with DataPower, providing our customers a seamless API Management solution.

SOA Software’s API Management solution for DataPower goes beyond basic API management by offering management of the full API lifecycle. From plan, to build, to run, to share, the API Management solution provides the ability for customers to manage every aspect of both APIs and internal services using a single, comprehensive solution. With this new solution, customers can realize a complete API solution quickly and cost effectively.

“APIs present a challenge to IT organizations today,” said Alistair Farquharson, CTO of SOA Software. “SOA Software’s unique approach to API management on DataPower allows IT organizations to keep pace with technology advances presented by next generation mobile and web applications while benefitting from the same rich enterprise support we already offer customers today. Our solution makes managing secure, integrated APIs easy, whether a mobile app needs to securely access mainframe data or a web application needs to initiate a business transaction using WebSphere MQ.”

The SOA Software API Management solution for DataPower supports a wide variety of API standards including REST, JSON, OAuth and OpenID. It ensures interoperability with diverse backend systems through its support for SOAP and WebSphere MQ. It supports diverse security standards including SAML, Kerberos, LDAP, X509 and WS-Security. DataPower’s enterprise integration capabilities for APIs are further strengthened by SOA Software’s rich orchestration features, as well as its support for transformations including WebSphere Transformation Extender. Support for monitoring, metrics, service level agreements, and API access control all ensure API programs run consistently and predictably.

The API Management solution for DataPower enables rich communities for DataPower API developers and app developers through its developer portal. The developer portal lets API developers publish their DataPower APIs for app developers to find and consume. Social media features, API documentation, and integrated forums make it easy for developers to collaborate. Real-time system monitoring gives developers up to date status of their APIs and apps.

APIs help organizations expose critical internal business data to their customers to increase transparency and improve the customer experience. SOA Software’s API Management solution for DataPower lets DataPower customers use DataPower to secure and integrate their APIs within an enterprise environment. The result is a cost effective, full lifecycle solution for DataPower APIs that makes it easy to quickly yet securely expose internal resources to mobile apps and Web applications.

About SOA Software

SOA Software is a leading provider of Enterprise API Management and SOA governance products that enable organizations to plan, build, run and share enterprise services and APIs. Some of the world’s largest companies including Bank of America, Pfizer, and Verizon use SOA Software products to harness the power of their technology and transform their businesses. Gartner placed SOA Software in the Leaders Quadrant for the 2011 “Magic Quadrant for SOA Governance Technologies.”

Google Play now Become the World’s Greatest Defeat Application Store App Store

Apple App Store now no longer be the world’s largest app store. Label the world’s largest app store is now officially carried by the Google Play Store that has 1 million applications.

The number also beat the applications now in the Apple App Store, which is 900 thousand units. This achievement was being the first time since the launch of Google Play Android operating system.

Not only that, Google Play Store is also giving a positive trend for the application developer. Google says that the current amount of revenue through the Play Store has increased 2.5-fold compared to the previous.

The last one, number download on Google Play Store also did not lose much. According to Google, the number of downloads in the Play Store has now reached more than 50 billion times. And it seems that number will continue to increase along with the increase of mobile phone users and Android tablets.

Software AG Named a Leader in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for On-Premises Application Integration Suites

Software AG today announced it was positioned by Gartner, Inc., a leading industry analyst firm, in the Leaders Quadrant of the recently published Magic Quadrant for On-Premises Application Integration Suites. In gaining this recognition, vendors were evaluated based on completeness of vision and ability to execute. The quadrant evaluates the application integration and SOA project market, which are strategic for Software AG as a vendor of application infrastructure middleware.

“We believe Gartner naming us as a leader with the furthest position on both axes in the Magic Quadrant for On-Premises Application Integration Suites* is a validation of our product innovation, high quality services and strong go to market model,” said Dr. Wolfram Jost, Software AG’s Chief Technology Officer. “Our goal is to continue to deliver the most comprehensive, innovative infrastructure middleware offerings that improve business outcomes of our customers, while enabling them to achieve better agility and drive growth.”

Gartner’s evaluation of Software AG is primarily based on its flagship offering webMethods Suite V9.0. It includes tightly integrated products such as webMethods Integration Server as an Enterprise Service Bus (ESB), Terracotta Universal Messaging for fast asynchronous messaging, webMethods Trading Networks for B2B integration, webMethods BPMS for process orchestrations and monitoring and CentraSite for metadata lifecycle management.

The nexus of four forces – cloud, mobile, social, and big data – are presenting unprecedented new opportunities to innovate and grow the business. With webMethods Suite, organizations can take full advantage of these opportunities by establishing a strong but flexible integration backbone to build new applications. It allows organizations to leverage existing IT investments while managing the proliferation of data, devices, and services resulting from the four forces.

Unlike other solutions in the market, the webMethods Suite is an open, cross platform solution. It delivers capabilities as building blocks that fit together allowing customer implementations to grow as their needs grow. It is also easy to use across all lifecycle stages from design to production, lowering total cost of ownership. Strong lifecycle governance baked into the platform helps companies maximize reuse and align closely with business needs.

Complimentary copies of Gartner’s report are available at www.softwareag.com/recognition.

* Gartner Magic Quadrant for On-Premises Application Integration Suites by Jess Thompson, Yefim V. Natis, Massimo Pezzini, Daniel Sholler, Ross Altman, Kimihiko Iijima, published 27 June 2013.

About the Magic Quadrant

Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

About Software AG

Software AG (SOW.F) helps organizations achieve their business objectives faster. The company’s big data, integration and business process technologies enable customers to drive operational efficiency, modernize their systems and optimize processes for smarter decisions and better service. Building on over 40 years of customer-centric innovation, the company is ranked as a leader in 15 market categories, fueled by core product families Adabas and Natural, ARIS, Terracotta and webMethods. Software AG has ca. 5,300 employees in 70 countries and had revenues of €1.05 billion in 2012.

Clustered NetApp Data ONTAP 8.2 Launches

Jakarta – NetApp introduced a new version of its flagship operating system storage, clustered Data ONTAP 8.2. Steven Law, NetApp Country Manager Indonesia, said the new software provides the ability for organizations and cloud services to offer new services and capacity with maximum application uptime quickly and cost-effectively.
Clustered Data ONTAP 8.2 is claimed to remove the limits of performance, availability, and efficiency of the traditional siled, and align storage infrastructure with business demands and ever-changing applications without interruption.
»Excellence is clustered Data ONTAP operating without interruption, scalability, and efficiency of storage that has been proven,” said Steven in Jakarta, Wednesday, July 17, 2013.
While changes in industry trends, has led NetApp become a multi-platform company. There are at least five trends that change the direction of NetApp, the flash technology, cloud computing, customers who want an easy-paced, mobile lifestyle, and large data storage needs.
»Change and development trend represents an opportunity for companies to grow and thrive. To seize that opportunity, NetApp needs to evolve into a multi-platform company that customers can prepare for the future, “said Steven.
As an initial step to deal with the changing trends NetApp, the NetApp over the past year to add two new business focus as a strategy, which is clustered Data ONTAP and E-Series Storage System.
If a series of Clustered Data ONTAP operating system, E-Series Storage is a range of flash storage array system maximize the value of the whole set of flash in computing, networking, and storage, thus providing flexibility in choosing the best approach for each work load.
NetApp recently launched EF540, which is the industry’s first flash array that combines extreme performance and consistent with the level of availability, reliability, high manageability and enterprise-class, as well as support services worldwide. Check out other techno news here.

Review: First 8-inch Windows tablet is a device that shouldn’t exist

My dissatisfaction with PC OEMs is something I have documented in the past. They offer a confusing array of products and tend to cut corners in the worst ways imaginable. The OEM response to Windows 8 has been to produce a wide range of machines sporting novel form factors to fit all sorts of niches, both real and imagined.

One niche that the OEMs haven’t tried to fill, however, has been sub-10-inch tablets. That’s not altogether surprising. Microsoft designed Windows 8 for screens of 10 inches or more, and initially the operating system’s hardware requirements had a similar constraint.

That decision looked a little short-sighted after the success of tablets such as the Google Nexus 7 and the iPad mini. Accordingly, Microsoft changed the rules in March, opening the door to a range of smaller Windows tablets.

The Acer Iconia W3 is the first—and currently the only—8-inch Windows tablet. That attribute alone makes it in some sense noteworthy. Sadly, it’s about the only thing that does.

Spec-wise, this is another Intel Clover Trail tablet, and its internals are basically the same as the devices that launched last year (such as its bigger brother, the Acer Iconia W510). This means 1.8 GHz, dual core, four thread Intel Atom Z2760 CPU, 2 GB RAM, 64 GB flash storage (which with Acer’s default partitioning leaves a little over 29 GB usable), front and rear cameras, Bluetooth 4.0, and 802.11b/g/n (no 5 GHz support). There’s a micro-HDMI and micro-USB port for external connectivity (a separate cable converts the micro USB port into a full-size one), along with an SD card slot. The tablet has a speaker adequate for notification sounds but little more.

As a result, performance and battery life are similar to what we’ve seen before. The Iconia W3 comes equipped with full-blown Windows 8, unlike ARM tablets, so it can run any 32-bit Windows application—should you really want to. Clover Trail’s GPU performance is such that games and other graphics-intensive programs won’t run well, however.

Eight inches of horror

The new bits on this tablet are really the screen and the size.

Screens are important. We spend essentially all our time interacting with devices looking at screens. Cost-cutting on screens is unforgivable, as a bad screen will damage every single interaction you have with the device. This goes doubly so for tablets, where the screen works not only as an output device but also as the primary input device.

The Acer Iconia W3’s screen is a standout—because it is worst-in-class. I hated every moment I used the Iconia W3, and I hated it because I hated the screen. Its color accuracy and viewing angles are both miserable (whites aren’t white—they’re weirdly colorful and speckled). The screen has a peculiar grainy appearance that makes it look permanently greasy. You can polish as much as you like; it will never go away. The whole effect is reminiscent in some ways of old resistive screens.

It’s hard to overstate just how poor this screen is. At any reasonable tablet viewing distance, the color of the screen is uneven. The viewing angle is so narrow that at typical hand-held distances, the colors change across the width of the screen. At full arm’s length the screen does finally look even, but the device is obviously unusable that way.

Acer has clearly skimped on the screen. I’m sure the panel in the W3 was quite cheap, and that may be somewhat reflected in the unit’s retail price ($379 for a 32GB unit, $429 for this 64GB one—putting it at the same price as the 32GB iPad mini, which has a comparable amount of available disk space), but who cares? It doesn’t matter how cheap something is if you don’t want to use it at all.

This poor screen quality isn’t a question of resolution, either. 1280×800 is not a tremendously high resolution, but text looks crisp enough. At 186 pixels per inch, 1280×800 feels more or less OK for this size of device.

The low resolution does, however, have one significant drawback: it disables Windows 8’s side-by-side Metro multitasking, which requires a resolution of at least 1366×768. The W3’s screen is 86 pixels too narrow, so the Metro environment is strictly one application at a time.

This is an unfortunate decision. The side-by-side multitasking is one of the Metro environment’s most compelling features. Keeping Twitter or Messenger snapped to the side makes a lot of sense and works well. I’ve never used Windows 8 on a device that didn’t support side-by-side Metro multitasking before, and I don’t ever want to again.

Size-wise, the W3 may be small for a Windows tablet, but it’s not exactly small. It’s fat. The W3 is 11.4 mm thick. The iPad mini, in comparison, is 7.2 mm thick. The Iconia W3 is also heavy at 500 g; the iPad mini, in comparison, is 308 g. That makes the W3 more than 50 percent thicker and more than 50 percent heavier.

The thickness makes the lack of a full-sized USB port on the device more than a little confusing. There’s certainly room for a full USB port, and a full port would be more convenient than the dongle. But for whatever reason, Acer didn’t give us one.

The device itself feels solid enough, albeit plasticky. It doesn’t exude quality, but it’s a step or two up from the bargain basement.

Keyboard non-dock

The W3 also has a keyboard accessory. As is common for this kind of thing, the keyboard has no electrical connection to the tablet. It’s a Bluetooth keyboard powered by a pair of AAA batteries. It has a groove along the top that can hold the tablet in both landscape and portrait orientations and a clip on the back that lets you use the keyboard as a kind of screen protector.

The keyboard has to be manually paired to the tablet. It’s more or less full-size, with a reasonable key layout. It’s a typical mediocre keyboard. The feel is a little on the squishy side, lacking the crispness of, for example Microsoft’s Type Cover for its Surface tablets. It’s better than any on-screen keyboard, and to that extent it does its job. But it’s a long way from being an actually good keyboard.

The groove does hold the tablet up, and on a level surface the unit doesn’t topple over, but it’s not as satisfactory as some of the hinged keyboard/docks we’ve seen on other devices. Tilt the base while carrying it or using it on your lap and the tablet is liable to fall out.

Leap Motion Controller, Great Hardware in Search of Great Software

By now, we all know what the future will be like; movies and TV shows have described it in detail. We know about the flying cars (thank you, “Blade Runner”), holograms (thank you, “Star Trek”) and robot butlers (thank you, “Jetsons”).

The Leap Motion Controller is a solution in search of a problem: its hardware is simple, but it needs a killer app.

So when will we really get those technologies? Probably on the 11th of “Don’t hold your breath.”

There is, however, one exception. As of this week, you can buy your own little piece of “Minority Report” and “Iron Man”: controlling your computer by making hand motions in the air.

The Internet has been buzzing about the much-delayed Leap Motion Controller ($80) since its first public demonstrations over a year ago. Imagine controlling on-screen objects just by reaching into empty space, just like Tom Cruise! Imagine gesture recognition just like Microsoft’s Kinect game controller, but on a much smaller, more precise scale! Imagine the future, plugged into a USB jack on the Mac or Windows PC you own today!

The Leap Motion sensor is beautiful, tiny and self-contained. If Wrigley’s ever comes out with a Juicy Fruit Designer Pack, it might look like this: a sleek, glass-and-aluminum slab (1.2 by 3 by 0.5 inches), with nonskid rubber on the bottom. A single USB cable (both a long one and a short one come in the box) stretches away to your computer; a light comes on when it’s working.

(Please note that Leap Motion has nothing to do with Leap Pad, the children’s toy. That gadget is educational in a completely different way.)

If you have a desktop computer, you put the sensor between your screen and keyboard. If it’s a laptop, you park it on the desk just in front of the keyboard. Soon, Leap says, you’ll be able to buy a PC from H.P. or Asus that has the sensor built right in.You download the Leap software, and presto: a somewhat buggy tutorial instructs you to insert your hands into the space — an invisible two-foot cube — that’s monitored by the Leap’s cameras and infrared sensors.

This device is like the Kinect in that it recognizes body parts in space. But not only is the Leap far smaller and less expensive, it’s also far more precise. According to the company, it can detect the precise positions of all 10 of your fingers simultaneously, with a spatial accuracy to a 100th of a millimeter — 200 times as accurate as the Kinect.

And remember, the Leap adds gesture recognition not to your TV, but to your computer. A machine that can run millions of different programs for all different purposes. Games, sure, but also office work. Creative work. Communication. Entertainment. Surely this little wonder is a very big deal.

Unfortunately, it’s not. The Leap’s hardware may be simple, attractive and coherent — but its software is scattershot, inconsistent and frustrating.

The first crushing disappointment is that no software recognizes your hand motions unless it’s been specially written, or adapted, for use by the Leap.

There are 75 such apps already on the Leap’s app store, Airspace; some are free, some cost a few dollars. Not all work on both Mac and Windows.

Most are games. In the best of them, you control the action in 3-D space, just as with the Kinect but without having to stand up. For example, Boom Ball ($5) is the classic Breakout game, where you try to knock out bricks by bouncing a ball against them — but your paddle is attached to your finger in vertical space.

In Disney’s clever Sugar Rush ($2), a spin off from the “Wreck-It Ralph” movie, you bake yourself a racing car shaped like a wedge of cake, and then steer it by holding both sides of an invisible steering wheel. When you play Dropchord ($3), you hold two index fingers out in space; you’re defining a line between them that you use to slice dots and avoid X’s. Cut the Rope is here, too (free).

There are some interesting music-making programs, which makes sense, since hand motions are generally associated with playing instruments. Air Harp ($1) is just what it sounds like. Chordion Conductor is a sweet-sounding arpeggiator (generates music from chords you select).

A few simple educational apps are available, like Molecules (rotate molecules on the screen; free), Cyber Science 3D (pull apart a skull; free) and Frog Dissection (you guessed it; $4).

WhatsApp Luncurkan Fitur Baru di Windows Phone

Jakarta – WhatsApp is one of the instant messaging service that can be used by many types of cell phone operating system. Not surprisingly, WhatsApp has 250 million active users. According to the Wall Street Journal website, this amount is equivalent to the number of users on Twitter, Facebook Messenger, and Skype.
What’s more, the instant messaging application also does not include ads in their services. Users were not bothered by ads that sometimes appear like the other instant messaging services.
Now, WhatsApp update the application with new features for Windows Phone users. Some of the new features that include
1. Make voice calls;
2. Background API (Application Programming Interface) which can play music;
3. New Smiley;
4. Notifications are updated to the user;
5. Quick summary (if the application is open and the user clicks the notification, the application will open fast like on Android);
6. The user will be asked whether you want to save the conversation history, users can arrange it through the settings menu, and
7. Images are displayed larger.
Updates on Windows Phone devices can be downloaded in Windows Phone Store.

Cbeyond Chooses Crafter Software to Create A Higher Quality Customer Web Experience, Boosting Engagement

Crafter Software Corp., a leading provider of software solutions for the creation of rich and engaging websites, mobile applications and multi-channel digital experiences, today announced thatCbeyond (CBEY) has chosen Crafter’s Web content and experience management solutions. Cbeyond replaced its existingWeb content management system with Crafter as part of a website rebranding effort to provide a far more dynamic, engaging Web experience flexible enough to integrate with various internal content systems. Since re-launching the Cbeyond site using Crafter, the website has generated 18 percent more leads and website traffic has increased nine percent.

“Crafter’s modular components and architecture integrated easily with our user login platform and customer management system. We now have the flexibility to create an engaging Web presence, are no longer boxed in to one type of look and can quickly tailor the site to our ongoing needs,” said Tom Ouellette, senior director, Marketing Communications at Cbeyond. “Best of all, Crafter’s user-friendly content authoring tools provide our website visitors with fresh content that best describes our cloud computing solutions.”

Cbeyond deployed Crafter Engine, a high-performance content delivery system, as a foundation for its new website. Crafter Engine is built from the ground up to easily tap into various data sources from social media, ERPs, CRMs, marketing campaign systems and others to create a dynamic Web experience that is specifically targeted to an individual user.

Cbeyond also rolled out Crafter Studio, a Web content authoring and publishing solution, to its marketing team. The product offers user-friendly features for marketers and content editors to enable easier and faster publishing across all channels, without any involvement from development or IT.

“We see accelerating demand for our software as today’s Web continues to evolve from a static publishing environment to a business-critical productivity and engagement platform,” said Mike Vertal, CEO of Crafter Software. “Cbeyond can now turn on a dime and quickly adapt to results from A/B split testing and other analytics data. We are thrilled to see their significant early return in terms of website traffic and Web-based leads.”

About Crafter Software

Crafter Software (Reston, Va.) enables the creation of rich and engaging websites, mobile applications, and multi-channel digital experiences. The company’s software solutions are based on the award-winning Crafter CMS open source project, which was built from the ground up as a modern platform for creating more relevant web experiences through targeted delivery of personalized content. Serving as the lynchpin between enterprise systems and end users, Crafter’s solutions enable marketing, sales and support teams to author and manage content while harvesting analytics and data-driven insights to deliver engaging experiences across all digital channels—the web, mobile, social, and more. For more information, visit craftersoftware.com and craftercms.org.