Category Archives: Software

Clustered NetApp Data ONTAP 8.2 Launches

Jakarta – NetApp introduced a new version of its flagship operating system storage, clustered Data ONTAP 8.2. Steven Law, NetApp Country Manager Indonesia, said the new software provides the ability for organizations and cloud services to offer new services and capacity with maximum application uptime quickly and cost-effectively.
Clustered Data ONTAP 8.2 is claimed to remove the limits of performance, availability, and efficiency of the traditional siled, and align storage infrastructure with business demands and ever-changing applications without interruption.
»Excellence is clustered Data ONTAP operating without interruption, scalability, and efficiency of storage that has been proven,” said Steven in Jakarta, Wednesday, July 17, 2013.
While changes in industry trends, has led NetApp become a multi-platform company. There are at least five trends that change the direction of NetApp, the flash technology, cloud computing, customers who want an easy-paced, mobile lifestyle, and large data storage needs.
»Change and development trend represents an opportunity for companies to grow and thrive. To seize that opportunity, NetApp needs to evolve into a multi-platform company that customers can prepare for the future, “said Steven.
As an initial step to deal with the changing trends NetApp, the NetApp over the past year to add two new business focus as a strategy, which is clustered Data ONTAP and E-Series Storage System.
If a series of Clustered Data ONTAP operating system, E-Series Storage is a range of flash storage array system maximize the value of the whole set of flash in computing, networking, and storage, thus providing flexibility in choosing the best approach for each work load.
NetApp recently launched EF540, which is the industry’s first flash array that combines extreme performance and consistent with the level of availability, reliability, high manageability and enterprise-class, as well as support services worldwide. Check out other techno news here.

Review: First 8-inch Windows tablet is a device that shouldn’t exist

My dissatisfaction with PC OEMs is something I have documented in the past. They offer a confusing array of products and tend to cut corners in the worst ways imaginable. The OEM response to Windows 8 has been to produce a wide range of machines sporting novel form factors to fit all sorts of niches, both real and imagined.

One niche that the OEMs haven’t tried to fill, however, has been sub-10-inch tablets. That’s not altogether surprising. Microsoft designed Windows 8 for screens of 10 inches or more, and initially the operating system’s hardware requirements had a similar constraint.

That decision looked a little short-sighted after the success of tablets such as the Google Nexus 7 and the iPad mini. Accordingly, Microsoft changed the rules in March, opening the door to a range of smaller Windows tablets.

The Acer Iconia W3 is the first—and currently the only—8-inch Windows tablet. That attribute alone makes it in some sense noteworthy. Sadly, it’s about the only thing that does.

Spec-wise, this is another Intel Clover Trail tablet, and its internals are basically the same as the devices that launched last year (such as its bigger brother, the Acer Iconia W510). This means 1.8 GHz, dual core, four thread Intel Atom Z2760 CPU, 2 GB RAM, 64 GB flash storage (which with Acer’s default partitioning leaves a little over 29 GB usable), front and rear cameras, Bluetooth 4.0, and 802.11b/g/n (no 5 GHz support). There’s a micro-HDMI and micro-USB port for external connectivity (a separate cable converts the micro USB port into a full-size one), along with an SD card slot. The tablet has a speaker adequate for notification sounds but little more.

As a result, performance and battery life are similar to what we’ve seen before. The Iconia W3 comes equipped with full-blown Windows 8, unlike ARM tablets, so it can run any 32-bit Windows application—should you really want to. Clover Trail’s GPU performance is such that games and other graphics-intensive programs won’t run well, however.

Eight inches of horror

The new bits on this tablet are really the screen and the size.

Screens are important. We spend essentially all our time interacting with devices looking at screens. Cost-cutting on screens is unforgivable, as a bad screen will damage every single interaction you have with the device. This goes doubly so for tablets, where the screen works not only as an output device but also as the primary input device.

The Acer Iconia W3’s screen is a standout—because it is worst-in-class. I hated every moment I used the Iconia W3, and I hated it because I hated the screen. Its color accuracy and viewing angles are both miserable (whites aren’t white—they’re weirdly colorful and speckled). The screen has a peculiar grainy appearance that makes it look permanently greasy. You can polish as much as you like; it will never go away. The whole effect is reminiscent in some ways of old resistive screens.

It’s hard to overstate just how poor this screen is. At any reasonable tablet viewing distance, the color of the screen is uneven. The viewing angle is so narrow that at typical hand-held distances, the colors change across the width of the screen. At full arm’s length the screen does finally look even, but the device is obviously unusable that way.

Acer has clearly skimped on the screen. I’m sure the panel in the W3 was quite cheap, and that may be somewhat reflected in the unit’s retail price ($379 for a 32GB unit, $429 for this 64GB one—putting it at the same price as the 32GB iPad mini, which has a comparable amount of available disk space), but who cares? It doesn’t matter how cheap something is if you don’t want to use it at all.

This poor screen quality isn’t a question of resolution, either. 1280×800 is not a tremendously high resolution, but text looks crisp enough. At 186 pixels per inch, 1280×800 feels more or less OK for this size of device.

The low resolution does, however, have one significant drawback: it disables Windows 8’s side-by-side Metro multitasking, which requires a resolution of at least 1366×768. The W3’s screen is 86 pixels too narrow, so the Metro environment is strictly one application at a time.

This is an unfortunate decision. The side-by-side multitasking is one of the Metro environment’s most compelling features. Keeping Twitter or Messenger snapped to the side makes a lot of sense and works well. I’ve never used Windows 8 on a device that didn’t support side-by-side Metro multitasking before, and I don’t ever want to again.

Size-wise, the W3 may be small for a Windows tablet, but it’s not exactly small. It’s fat. The W3 is 11.4 mm thick. The iPad mini, in comparison, is 7.2 mm thick. The Iconia W3 is also heavy at 500 g; the iPad mini, in comparison, is 308 g. That makes the W3 more than 50 percent thicker and more than 50 percent heavier.

The thickness makes the lack of a full-sized USB port on the device more than a little confusing. There’s certainly room for a full USB port, and a full port would be more convenient than the dongle. But for whatever reason, Acer didn’t give us one.

The device itself feels solid enough, albeit plasticky. It doesn’t exude quality, but it’s a step or two up from the bargain basement.

Keyboard non-dock

The W3 also has a keyboard accessory. As is common for this kind of thing, the keyboard has no electrical connection to the tablet. It’s a Bluetooth keyboard powered by a pair of AAA batteries. It has a groove along the top that can hold the tablet in both landscape and portrait orientations and a clip on the back that lets you use the keyboard as a kind of screen protector.

The keyboard has to be manually paired to the tablet. It’s more or less full-size, with a reasonable key layout. It’s a typical mediocre keyboard. The feel is a little on the squishy side, lacking the crispness of, for example Microsoft’s Type Cover for its Surface tablets. It’s better than any on-screen keyboard, and to that extent it does its job. But it’s a long way from being an actually good keyboard.

The groove does hold the tablet up, and on a level surface the unit doesn’t topple over, but it’s not as satisfactory as some of the hinged keyboard/docks we’ve seen on other devices. Tilt the base while carrying it or using it on your lap and the tablet is liable to fall out.

Leap Motion Controller, Great Hardware in Search of Great Software

By now, we all know what the future will be like; movies and TV shows have described it in detail. We know about the flying cars (thank you, “Blade Runner”), holograms (thank you, “Star Trek”) and robot butlers (thank you, “Jetsons”).

The Leap Motion Controller is a solution in search of a problem: its hardware is simple, but it needs a killer app.

So when will we really get those technologies? Probably on the 11th of “Don’t hold your breath.”

There is, however, one exception. As of this week, you can buy your own little piece of “Minority Report” and “Iron Man”: controlling your computer by making hand motions in the air.

The Internet has been buzzing about the much-delayed Leap Motion Controller ($80) since its first public demonstrations over a year ago. Imagine controlling on-screen objects just by reaching into empty space, just like Tom Cruise! Imagine gesture recognition just like Microsoft’s Kinect game controller, but on a much smaller, more precise scale! Imagine the future, plugged into a USB jack on the Mac or Windows PC you own today!

The Leap Motion sensor is beautiful, tiny and self-contained. If Wrigley’s ever comes out with a Juicy Fruit Designer Pack, it might look like this: a sleek, glass-and-aluminum slab (1.2 by 3 by 0.5 inches), with nonskid rubber on the bottom. A single USB cable (both a long one and a short one come in the box) stretches away to your computer; a light comes on when it’s working.

(Please note that Leap Motion has nothing to do with Leap Pad, the children’s toy. That gadget is educational in a completely different way.)

If you have a desktop computer, you put the sensor between your screen and keyboard. If it’s a laptop, you park it on the desk just in front of the keyboard. Soon, Leap says, you’ll be able to buy a PC from H.P. or Asus that has the sensor built right in.You download the Leap software, and presto: a somewhat buggy tutorial instructs you to insert your hands into the space — an invisible two-foot cube — that’s monitored by the Leap’s cameras and infrared sensors.

This device is like the Kinect in that it recognizes body parts in space. But not only is the Leap far smaller and less expensive, it’s also far more precise. According to the company, it can detect the precise positions of all 10 of your fingers simultaneously, with a spatial accuracy to a 100th of a millimeter — 200 times as accurate as the Kinect.

And remember, the Leap adds gesture recognition not to your TV, but to your computer. A machine that can run millions of different programs for all different purposes. Games, sure, but also office work. Creative work. Communication. Entertainment. Surely this little wonder is a very big deal.

Unfortunately, it’s not. The Leap’s hardware may be simple, attractive and coherent — but its software is scattershot, inconsistent and frustrating.

The first crushing disappointment is that no software recognizes your hand motions unless it’s been specially written, or adapted, for use by the Leap.

There are 75 such apps already on the Leap’s app store, Airspace; some are free, some cost a few dollars. Not all work on both Mac and Windows.

Most are games. In the best of them, you control the action in 3-D space, just as with the Kinect but without having to stand up. For example, Boom Ball ($5) is the classic Breakout game, where you try to knock out bricks by bouncing a ball against them — but your paddle is attached to your finger in vertical space.

In Disney’s clever Sugar Rush ($2), a spin off from the “Wreck-It Ralph” movie, you bake yourself a racing car shaped like a wedge of cake, and then steer it by holding both sides of an invisible steering wheel. When you play Dropchord ($3), you hold two index fingers out in space; you’re defining a line between them that you use to slice dots and avoid X’s. Cut the Rope is here, too (free).

There are some interesting music-making programs, which makes sense, since hand motions are generally associated with playing instruments. Air Harp ($1) is just what it sounds like. Chordion Conductor is a sweet-sounding arpeggiator (generates music from chords you select).

A few simple educational apps are available, like Molecules (rotate molecules on the screen; free), Cyber Science 3D (pull apart a skull; free) and Frog Dissection (you guessed it; $4).

WhatsApp Luncurkan Fitur Baru di Windows Phone

Jakarta – WhatsApp is one of the instant messaging service that can be used by many types of cell phone operating system. Not surprisingly, WhatsApp has 250 million active users. According to the Wall Street Journal website, this amount is equivalent to the number of users on Twitter, Facebook Messenger, and Skype.
What’s more, the instant messaging application also does not include ads in their services. Users were not bothered by ads that sometimes appear like the other instant messaging services.
Now, WhatsApp update the application with new features for Windows Phone users. Some of the new features that include
1. Make voice calls;
2. Background API (Application Programming Interface) which can play music;
3. New Smiley;
4. Notifications are updated to the user;
5. Quick summary (if the application is open and the user clicks the notification, the application will open fast like on Android);
6. The user will be asked whether you want to save the conversation history, users can arrange it through the settings menu, and
7. Images are displayed larger.
Updates on Windows Phone devices can be downloaded in Windows Phone Store.

Cbeyond Chooses Crafter Software to Create A Higher Quality Customer Web Experience, Boosting Engagement

Crafter Software Corp., a leading provider of software solutions for the creation of rich and engaging websites, mobile applications and multi-channel digital experiences, today announced thatCbeyond (CBEY) has chosen Crafter’s Web content and experience management solutions. Cbeyond replaced its existingWeb content management system with Crafter as part of a website rebranding effort to provide a far more dynamic, engaging Web experience flexible enough to integrate with various internal content systems. Since re-launching the Cbeyond site using Crafter, the website has generated 18 percent more leads and website traffic has increased nine percent.

“Crafter’s modular components and architecture integrated easily with our user login platform and customer management system. We now have the flexibility to create an engaging Web presence, are no longer boxed in to one type of look and can quickly tailor the site to our ongoing needs,” said Tom Ouellette, senior director, Marketing Communications at Cbeyond. “Best of all, Crafter’s user-friendly content authoring tools provide our website visitors with fresh content that best describes our cloud computing solutions.”

Cbeyond deployed Crafter Engine, a high-performance content delivery system, as a foundation for its new website. Crafter Engine is built from the ground up to easily tap into various data sources from social media, ERPs, CRMs, marketing campaign systems and others to create a dynamic Web experience that is specifically targeted to an individual user.

Cbeyond also rolled out Crafter Studio, a Web content authoring and publishing solution, to its marketing team. The product offers user-friendly features for marketers and content editors to enable easier and faster publishing across all channels, without any involvement from development or IT.

“We see accelerating demand for our software as today’s Web continues to evolve from a static publishing environment to a business-critical productivity and engagement platform,” said Mike Vertal, CEO of Crafter Software. “Cbeyond can now turn on a dime and quickly adapt to results from A/B split testing and other analytics data. We are thrilled to see their significant early return in terms of website traffic and Web-based leads.”

About Crafter Software

Crafter Software (Reston, Va.) enables the creation of rich and engaging websites, mobile applications, and multi-channel digital experiences. The company’s software solutions are based on the award-winning Crafter CMS open source project, which was built from the ground up as a modern platform for creating more relevant web experiences through targeted delivery of personalized content. Serving as the lynchpin between enterprise systems and end users, Crafter’s solutions enable marketing, sales and support teams to author and manage content while harvesting analytics and data-driven insights to deliver engaging experiences across all digital channels—the web, mobile, social, and more. For more information, visit craftersoftware.com and craftercms.org.

Crank Software Selects GrammaTech to Turn Up Software Quality and Security

GrammaTech, Inc., a leading software developer specializing in software assurance tools, today announced that Crank Software, Inc., an innovator of embedded graphical user interface (GUI) solutions, is using GrammaTech’s CodeSonar to advance the integrity of their code.

Crank Software’s products and services enable R&D teams and user interface (UI) designers to quickly and collaboratively develop rich, animated UIs for resource-constrained embedded devices. These embedded software solutions are used in safety-critical applications, such as animated global positioning systems, in-car graphical displays and user interfaces on factory floors, so software quality and security are paramount. To enhance these areas, the team at Crank is now using CodeSonar’s advanced static analysis capability to more efficiently find and fix quality and security issues within their code.

“We wanted an innovative, high-performance static analysis tool we could drop into our process and quickly see improvements,” explained Thomas Fletcher, VP of Research and Development at Crank Software. Now that Crank’s development teams have integrated CodeSonar into their production process, quantifiable results have reinforced their choice to adopt the powerful tool. “Issues are being caught and fixed very early in the coding process. I look at these as problems I won’t have to hassle with in QA, and most critically, calls to customers I will never have to make,” he said.

CodeSonar provides Crank’s team with a high quality solution that integrates well and allows Crank’s engineers to fix problems early in development, saving time. As a result, they’ve also improved their end product and Crank Software is now feeling better-positioned for the certifications it wants to achieve to drive greater adoption. As Fletcher explained, “We wanted a comprehensive tool to push the quality and security of our software forward. And we got exactly what we aimed for.”

For a more detailed look into Crank Software’s adoption of CodeSonar, view the case study.

About GrammaTech and CodeSonar:
GrammaTech’s static analysis tools are used worldwide by Fortune 500 companies, educational institutions, startups and government agencies. The staff includes 15 PhD experts in static analysis and a superb engineering team, all focused on creating the most innovative and in-depth analysis algorithms. The company’s flagship product, CodeSonar, is a sophisticated static analysis tool that performs a whole-program, interprocedural analysis on C/C++, Java and binary code, identifying complex programming bugs that can result in serious reliability or security problems. More information about CodeSonar can be found on our website at

Application Encryption VSEncryptor

File Protector Portable Applications

VSEncryptor is an application that can be petrified our encryption protects files and text by scrambling the contents and form of the original will only display such content if the correct password is entered.

Portable VSEncryptorVersi this application is free. However, although it does not require installation, by default it has several options to change the entries in the registry. If you choose to install this application, note that it will replace the search engine and homepage in Internet Explorer and Mozilla Firefox. Unless you choose a custom installation, you can prevent these changes on your browser.

Although the application user interface is so simple and less attractive, but its function is quite good. In the main window there is a list of “encryption algorithms” which is quite interesting. You can select AES (128/192/256-bit) RC2/4/5/6, DES and Triple DES, Blowfish, Twofish, Serpent, Camellia, Skipjack, CAST-256, MARS, IDEA, SEED, GOST, XTEA, and SHACAL-2.

VSEncryptor can use these algorithms to randomize the plain text and other types of files. As soon as you press the encryption button, this app will ask you to enter a password that will also be used to decrypt the data.

It does not take long to encrypt the plain text, as well as encrypting other types of files. To file size of about 20 MB, it only takes a few seconds. Encrypt speed also depends on the chosen algorithm. By default, the encryption result is stored in the same location as the original file, but we also can change it as you wish.

By default again, VSEncryptor add a new file extension that is <. Encrypted> for encrypted items. The same option is also available to decrypt the file, only the extension form <. Decrypted>.

Rocket Software Releases Rocket z/SQL

Rocket Software, Inc. (www.rocketsoftware.com) today announced the general availability of Rocket z/SQL for IBM System z customers who are ready to turn their valuable petabytes of non-relational data into actionable intelligence. Rocket z/SQL is a new product that allows mainframe data to better integrate with enterprise business intelligence and analytics initiatives while reducing cost and complexity.

“We recognize that data is a huge challenge, and a huge opportunity, for our customers,” says Sam Elias, Rocket Vice President and General Manager. “Our customers see real value in accessing their data in place with standard off the shelf tools that speak SQL. Rocket z/SQL makes non-relational data as simple to access as an Excel spreadsheet.”

“We are rapidly heading towards a world of analytics everywhere,” said Dan Sommer principal research analyst at Gartner. “Gartner predicts that analytics will reach 50 percent of potential users by 2014. By 2020, that figure will be 75 percent, and we will be in a world where systems of record, systems of differentiation and systems of innovation are enabling IT, business and individuals to analyze data in a much denser fashion than before.”

Rocket z/SQL gives organizations industry-standard access to non-relational mainframe data without moving data off the mainframe. Traditional approaches require complex techniques, steps, and processes that move, copy, and transfer mainframe data before information can be used by applications and decision makers. With Rocket z/SQL, data is accessible in place through any SQL tool. Rocket z/SQL utilizes patent-pending integration architecture to perform all data transformations and joins in place – on the mainframe – with significantly reduced processing costs.

About Rocket Software

Rocket Software (www.rocketsoftware.com) is a global software development firm that builds enterprise products and delivers enterprise solutions in the following segments: Business Intelligence and Analytics; Storage, Networks, and Compliance; Application Development, Integration, and Modernization; and Database Servers and Tools

Adobe completes $600M purchase of Neolane

Calif. (AP) — Adobe Systems Inc. said Tuesday that it has closed on a $600 million purchase of Neolane, a French company that provides technology for marketing campaigns.

Adobe, which makes Photoshop and other creative software and is shifting its business to a subscription model, said that Neolane would bolster its digital-marketing services.

The San Jose, Calif., company already has digital marketing services, including analytics and targeting. Neolane’s technology, meanwhile, helps companies manage marketing campaigns on the Internet, email, social media and mobile devices, as well as through call centers and direct mail. It has more than 400 customers around the world, many of whom also used Adobe services.

When it announced its plans for the deal last month, Adobe said buying Neolane would not significantly affect its results this year. The company couldn’t estimate the effect of the acquisition on future earnings.

Adobe’s stock closed Monday at $48.28, up 28 percent this year.

DataCore Software Builds on Software-Defined Storage Momentum and Names Paul Murphy as Vice President of Worldwide Marketing

DataCore Software, the premier provider of storage virtualization software, today announced the appointment of Paul Murphy as the vice president of worldwide marketing. Murphy will oversee DataCore’s demand generation, inside sales and strategic marketing efforts needed to expand and accelerate the company’s growth and presence in the storage and virtualization sectors.  He brings to DataCore a proven track-record and a deep understanding of virtualization, storage technologies and the pivotal forces impacting customers in today’s ‘software-defined’ world. Murphy will drive the company’s marketing organization and programs to fuel sales for DataCore’s acclaimed storage virtualization software solution, SANsymphony™- V.

“Our software solutions have been successfully deployed at thousands of sites around the world and now our priority is to reach out to a broader range of organizations that don’t yet realize the economic and productivity benefits they can achieve through the adoption of storage virtualization and SANsymphony-V,” said DataCore Software’s Chief Operating Officer, Steve Houck. “Murphy brings to the company a fresh strategic marketing perspective, the ability to simplify our messaging, new ways to energize our outbound marketing activities and the drive to expand our visibility and brand recognition around the world.”

With nearly 15 years of experience in the technology industry, Murphy possesses a diverse range of skills in areas including engineering, services, sales and marketing, which will be instrumental in overseeing DataCore’s marketing activities around the globe. He was previously Director Americas SMB Sales and Worldwide Channel Development Manager at VMware, where he developed go-to-market strategies and oversaw both direct and inside channel sales teams in both domestic and international markets.

Prior to that, Murphy was senior product marketing manager at NetApp, focusing on backup and recovery solutions and their Virtual Tape Library product line. In this role, Murphy led business development activities, sales training, compensation programs and joint-marketing campaigns. An excellent communicator, he has been a keynote speaker at numerous industry events, trade shows, end-user seminars, sales training events, partner/reseller events and webcasts. Before moving into sales and marketing, Murphy had a successful career in engineering.

“The timing is perfect. DataCore has just updated its SANsymphony-V storage virtualization platform and it is well positioned to take advantage of the paradigm shift and acceptance of software-defined storage infrastructures,” said Murphy. “After doing the market research and getting feedback from numerous customers, it is clear to me that there is a large degree of pent-up customer demand. Needless to say, I’m eager to spread the word on DataCore’s value proposition and make a difference in this exciting and critical role.”

About DataCore Software

DataCore Software develops storage virtualization software leveraged in virtual and physical IT environments to obtain high availability, fast performance and maximum utilization from storage. DataCore’s SANsymphony-V storage hypervisor is a comprehensive, yet hardware-independent solution which fundamentally changes the economics of provisioning, replicating and protecting storage for large enterprises and small to midsize businesses. For additional information, visit the DataCore website at or call (877) 780-5111.

DataCore, the DataCore logo and SANsymphony are trademarks or registered trademarks of DataCore Software Corporation. Other DataCore product or service names or logos referenced herein are trademarks of DataCore Software Corporation. All other products, services and company names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective owners.