Category Archives: Food

Sahara Desert Tips and Restaurants

The Sahara is considered as the largest and hottest desert situated in Northern Africa. Many restaurants located near the Sahara offer different specialties that would range from the meat of lamb, chicken or even a mixture of other delicacies. They also love to eat vegetables. They even prepare salads, in form of tuna and vegetables.

Most fine dining restaurants from all parts of the world serve a dish influenced by North African recipes. The restaurants along the Sahara desert offer their best in culinary cuisine. The unique flavors come with the unique way of preparing it. The way they cook in these regions, until after the preparation of foods on the plate are similar to contemporary catering.

Customers always leave the dining areas very satisfied and fulfilled. Some tourists who visit the Sahara also go to fine restaurants nearby or near their hotels in order to experience that extraordinary African cuisine. In fact, they are more recognized for the quality and great tasting sauces as well as the mixture of spices they put in every dish.

There are also numerous restaurants along the Sahara that serve seafood. Most of these restaurants are still influenced by the culinary masterpieces of a North African chef.

Tips while Traveling to the Sahara
People may find restaurants near the Sahara either through tour guides or by looking at a travel guide book. As a general rule, if you are not familiar with the places around or even within the desert, it is best to hire a tour guide or a local who can take you to the places of interest near and within the area. Aside from the dialect, a guide can help you get the best lodging accommodations and they can take you to the most popular dining spots. They can also translate words or conversations you find very difficult to understand.

When you leave your hotel, make sure that you keep all the important documents in a safe place. Make sure that you have photocopies of these important documents and you have left copies at home.

Make sure you also bring some loose change when you tour the area. Never bring lots of money when you leave the hotel but don’t just leave your money inside the hotel. It is wise to check in a hotel that has a safety deposit box where you can put your valuables.

Although it is practical to check in to cheap hotels, it is best to inspect the hotel. If you think it is not a safe place to stay in or your valuables are at risk, then it is better to go with a hotel that you are familiar with. You’ll never go wrong with a rated hotel.

Sahara Restaurants
There is a restaurant near a fuel station along the Western section of the Sahara, between Guergarat and El Dakla. They have a great selection of foods. They also have an autogril and a rest shop. This fuel station restaurant offers breakfast, lunch or even snacks. It is not that expensive since a meal will only cost you $10 USD.

Another stop-by restaurant is found along the south section of El Dakla. It is located near a fuel station. They serve delicious omelets, breads and yogurts. They have a cafeteria that serves a very popular type of mint tea. You can spend less than $10 USD by visiting this restaurant called brunch en route.

Lastly, there is a resto-bar that lies within the western section of the Sahara. They serve food and drinks. You can experience fine dining dinner or you can just stop by to have a couple of wines and liquors. Their menu includes dishes like Chicken Tanjine and many other great tasting recipes. They also have the best cold drinks and mixes. This is located along the north section of the Mauntritrian Border. It is called the Bar Restaurant Barbas. They accept all major credit cards as well.

Distorting the Worlds of Muscle and Fitness

Nothing has been more distortive to muscle building information than the low profile prevalence of steroid use. What else can explain the vast amount of lousy and even useless training techniques for natural trainers that have become the prevailing wisdom in the bodybuilding industry? There’s an ongoing discord between fantasy and reality in what constitutes an effective natural muscle gaining routine. That discord is most likely attributable to the obvious yet often unaddressed contrast between the physiology of a steroid user and that of a non-user.

This contrast is the only explanation for bodybuilding’s longtime miring in misinformation; a muddling that’s often resulted in almost humorously contradictory recommendations and advice.

Here’s a list of strange observations I’ve made over the years that I think can be linked, either directly or indirectly, to some of that misinformation:

o In 1988, I attended a bodybuilding seminar put on by one of the top Mr. Olympia contenders of the time. When asked by an audience member about a specific workout routine, the pro bodybuilder answered that the workout schedule in question would be worthless for putting on muscle mass. Within a month, I saw that exact workout/recovery schedule being recommended in a bodybuilding magazine by the then-Mr. Olympia.

o In the ’90s, that same Mr. Olympia had a morning workout television program for mainstream fitness. During an episode, I heard him talk to Geraldo Riviera about the evils of “anabolics” (code-word for steroids). He was apparently trying to dissuade youngsters from using them. Yet he admitted within other mediums that he used them regularly (of course he used them; he was a pro bodybuilder).

o During the aforementioned seminar in 1988, that Mr. Olympia contender told the audience that when he began bodybuilding, he was able to put on “ten solid pounds of muscle per year”. He went on to reveal that in his advanced stages in the sport, he was lucky to add “two pounds of muscle a year”. These words were from an elite professional bodybuilder who admitted to regular steroid use. Yet we’re treated to claims of gaining “twenty pounds of muscle in twelve weeks” from average Joe’s on the Internet. (no wonder I don’t see pictures with these claims).

o In the late eighties, there was a bodybuilding book that claimed you could gain 30 pounds of muscle in six weeks from doing “super squats” and drinking a lot of milk. That book should have been titled ‘How to become an over-trained gasbag within a month and a half’.

o I’ve actually heard a top professional bodybuilder say he didn’t believe in over-training; only “under eating and under sleeping”. So, even though our bodies are designed to burn and renew a finite amount of energy each day, just stuffing them with more food than they can process and sleeping until we’re drooling on our pillows will compensate for excessive muscle teardown? A very misleading statement.

o In the early ’90s, a bodybuilding guru was espousing an extremely high calorie diet for gaining muscle. I think he was the guy who started the “no such thing as over-training – just under-eating and under-sleeping” nonsense. Anyway, in order to make sure we could all take in our recommended 10,000 calories a day, he’d sell MCT oil to everyone. Just dowse some on your meals and add a whopping 120 calories per tablespoon so you can be in an “anabolic state”. The funny thing was that he recommended doing aerobic exercise each day to burn excess calories. Now let’s see, I think I’ll spend money on extra calories so I can try to burn them off each day before I turn into Jabba the Hut. Yeah… that makes a lot of sense. Yet there were write-ups about this guy in magazines as if he were a genius.

o I read an old interview of Arnold Schwarzenegger in which he estimated that anabolic steroids only gave bodybuilders like him a five percent edge over what they’d accomplish without them. Did he expect readers to believe that? Why would anyone risk their health for such a meager boost? If that were true, couldn’t he find a way to make up that little five percent in a less destructive manner?

o Back when the andro thing was big, a bodybuilder who worked in a supplement store tried to talk me into buying some. He said he gained five pounds of muscle in three weeks from using it. I knew he wanted to get super big, so I immediately wondered why he wasn’t continuing to cycle it so that he could gain umpteen pounds for the year. I told him “I’m not impressed; I can gain or lose five pounds of water weight in a single day”. Within a few months, he did a steroid cycle. I wondered what happened to his belief in andro.

o A competitive, steroid-built bodybuilder who works out at my gym sidelines as a personal fitness trainer. I witnessed him simultaneously train two people on a leg workout that had those unfortunate clients wobbling for the door as if he’d turned their underpinnings into wet noodles. He’d coaxed them to perform set after set of forced reps on a leg press machine. They were shaking their heads in disbelief as he wore an expression of self-indulged smugness. I guess he forgot to tell them they’d need to make secret trips to Mexico in order to recover from such a “workout”.

Some of these are kind of humorous, but not that last one. I’ve seen too many people hand over their hard-earned money for instruction in natural bodybuilding from those who don’t build their own bodies naturally. That’s money being paid oftentimes to merely feed the ego of someone that probably knows less about your body than you do. In the case I described above, he sure doesn’t know enough about bodybuilding to realize that the simplistic “harder you train – the more you gain” mantra most often leads to wasted time and disappointment.

My advice to natural bodybuilders: Seek unorthodox methods for making muscle gains. The routines that keep getting regurgitated in mainstream bodybuilding and fitness magazines are usually not the most conducive to long-term muscle gains.

Which Ingredients Make Good Pet Foods?

When you are considering which pet food to choose for your pet the most important consideration should always be the ingredients. The quality of the ingredients are what truly set premium foods apart from the poorer grades of foods.

When you look at a pet food label the ingredients are required to be listed in order of weight or predominance in the food. However, this can be slightly misleading. This is weight prior to processing. This means that if whole chicken is used in the food it may be listed first in the ingredient list, which sounds very appealing to the customer. Whole chicken contains a great deal of moisture. By the time the chicken is processed it weighs much less. For this reason, some people prefer to see things like chicken meal, or lamb meal in the first few spots in the ingredient list since these ingredients have already had the moisture removed from them prior to weighing for use in making the pet food.

According to the respected Whole Dog Journal, and other sources, for dogs it’s good to see multiple sources of animal protein in the first five ingredients of a premium dog food. It’s especially important to have a good source of protein in the first couple of ingredients. The exception would be with foods that are sold as pre-mixes, such as dehydrated or freeze dried foods, which are intended to be supplemented with protein sources by the owner. In these cases you would not expect to see protein sources among the first few ingredients.

Many concerned owners look for the following in their pet foods:

You should avoid generic ingredients such as “meat meal” or “animal fat.” Instead look for named sources such as beef fat, chicken fat, lamb meal, fish, etc.

Look for human grade, USDA approved ingredients. Pet food cannot, by law, be sold for human consumption, but look for companies that are committed to using human grade ingredients. You can also seek out hormone- and antibiotic-free meats. All poultry is already raised hormone-free in the U.S. but other meats are not necessarily raised this way unless specified.

Try to avoid foods that use corn gluten meal and other glutens. Many dogs are allergic to corn. Corn gluten is often a cheap protein filler and waste product from other industries. There can be similar problems with wheat gluten and rice protein concentrate, which are also used as fillers.

Avoid “meat by-products” and “meat digests.” When reading pet food labels look for specific, named sources of protein, such as lamb, chicken, tuna, beef, and so on. The term “meat” is a catch-all phrase that allows the pet food industry to be very unspecific about what kind of meat it’s using, so you don’t know what you could be feeding your pet.

There’s also a vast difference in preparation between “whole” chicken, chicken “meal,” chicken “by-products,” and chicken “digests.” Each term describes different preparation and parts of the chicken used. As a consumer and pet owner, you want to purchase foods which rely primarily on whole foods and meals. These are the foods which are closest to their original, live form and contain the most nutrition. By-products and digests contain necks, feet, intestines and other parts of the animal that you would not consider fit for human consumption.

Many foods may contain these ingredients as well as the more premium ingredients. But the primary ingredients you should look for should be whole foods and meals made from named meat sources.

Avoid BHA, BHT and Ethoxyquin. These are artificial preservatives and often used in poor quality foods. Ethoxyquin is banned in foods for human consumption except as a color preservative in spices.

Avoid artificial colors, sugars and sweeteners.

Another thing to watch for on the ingredient list is “splitting” — many times an ingredient such as corn is split into multiple listings — ground yellow corn, corn gluten meal, and other corn sources. Singly they are not a big presence, but added together, corn can become the biggest ingredient in your dog’s diet.

Taurine was added to cat foods in the 1970s when cats began going blind and dying due to taurine deficiencies. Dogs were thought not to need taurine but now links are being found that suggest they do require it. Some companies have begun adding it to dog foods.

Many people also prefer to buy from companies that have U.S.-grown ingredients. This isn’t simply patriotism. The United States has some of the strictest regulations in the world for growing and manufacturing foods. Some companies list the source of their ingredients on their Web sites but it is more difficult to find out this information from other companies.

Some people prefer to feed their pets so-called “exotic” protein diets — venison, buffalo, duck, trout, etc. They may be trying to find foods that won’t trigger allergies in their pets. In general, it’s considered good advice to avoid feeding your dog (or cat) such unusual proteins unless he or she already has an allergy problem. If your pet does well on a more common protein it’s a good idea to stick with it and save the exotic proteins for a time when it’s needed. That way you know you have some options if you run into problems. If your pet should develop an allergy to the exotic proteins you would have nowhere to go.

High protein diets are very popular at the moment. The old ideas about excessive protein possibly harming your pet’s kidneys seem to have been debunked. However, if you wish to try a high protein diet, or one of the new grain-free diets, make sure that you find a food that has the AAFCO Nutritional Adequacy statement. You want to make sure that you are feeding a food that is nutritionally balanced.

Fitness Personal Training for Healthy and Fit Living

It’s never easy to avoid being a victim of food. Chocolates, ice cream, cake, etc., how can one resist? It’s really hard to avoid digging in to a plate of delicious goodness. But, if you want to stay healthy and fit, do you have to neglect eating? The answer is no! There’s no need to watch out keenly over your diet. You can lose those extra ounces of fat in your body without having to starve to death. The secret to a healthy and fit life is fitness personal training.Read more

Quick not rot, Cucumber Wrap with plastic It

CUCUMBER usually placed as fresh vegetables, garnishes, salads, or pickled. Water content is 95 percent easier cucumber becomes soft if one storage.

Cucumber has a short shelf life. Most cucumbers at the supermarket sold wrapped in an airtight plastic wrap. Because, cucumber wrapped airtight resilient little longer when compared with fresh cucumbers open, as reviewed Eatbydate.

Knowing the cucumber begins to break
Mostly intact cucumbers usually have longer staying power because it still has the protective skin, which also contains nutrients. You can find out whether the cucumbers start foul by seeing and feeling directly.

The common trait is a bad cucumber damp surface. Cucumber becomes soft and slimy white surface and should not be eaten.

Maintain hygiene and food safety will help prevent rapid deterioration of food. Of course there are certain health risks if you eat a cucumber that has been damaged.

How to save the cucumber
Proper food storage is the key to extend durability. For cucumbers, it is best to keep it in one piece and unpeeled in a plastic bag in the refrigerator vegetable special shelf. Do not wash before storing it in the refrigerator.

Fresh unpeeled cucumber or cut resilient week to 10 days. For the preserved cucumber can last 1-2 weeks, while the already sliced ​​can only survive 1-2 days.

Although it is not frozen, small cucumbers and make pickles feels hard. Some benefits of proper food store than you are eating healthy foods, eating out less expensive because you will not waste food if it breaks down more quickly.

If you have a cucumber in large quantities and is likely to soon deteriorate, then cut into pieces and mix the tomato chunks and add your favorite salad dressing.

My Nutritional Advice From a Personal Trainer

What’s the point of doing extensive exercises and workouts when you don’t get and maintain a proper diet and nutrition? Your Personal Trainer will not only guide you through the workouts, but also help control of your appetite, diet and nutrition plans. Since your goal is to build your body in such a way that you’ll look and feel good and healthy, it is therefore important that you watch what you eat because some of it could just make the program and your efforts useless.Read more

What is traditional Christmas cooking

What is traditional Christmas cooking? Well, that depends on you and your family. Tradition is something you make up as you go along. A traditional Christmas is what is traditional in your home. It may be a recipe handed down from your great grandmother or it may be something you thought of in a desperate hurry last Christmas Eve. Anything can become a tradition. What makes something traditional depends on how we feel about it.

That said, once something becomes traditional then you change it at your peril. If your children expect to come home to stir the Christmas pudding and put in the family favors then you had better not change it. For more details www.cooking-chinese-style.com .They may be away at college or carving out a big career for themselves in the city but they will still expect Christmas to be the Christmas they remember. Christmas cooking is a big part, maybe the biggest part, of the way we remember Christmas.

Every part of Christmas is accompanied by food of one sort or another. The tastes and smells of that food fixes the memory of Christmas in our minds. That smell of cinnamon or hot sugar. If we catch a hint of it anywhere at anytime we are transported instantly back in time to a Christmas kitchen of our childhood. That is the power of traditional Christmas cooking.

I remember how when my mother-in-law was alive and would come to us for Christmas dinner, I had to cook a big traditional turkey dinner with all the trimmings. Turkey seemed a very dry meat to me so I looked through one of my cookery books and found a recipe that involved glazing the turkey with apricot jam for the last 15 minutes of cooking. As a “proper” cook I was appalled, but it seemed to work, so every year I poured a pot of apricot jam over my turkey and, I have to confess, it was delicious.

When my mother-in-law died I saw the opportunity to change our family’s traditional Christmas cooking routine. At last my culinary skills would find true expression in a Christmas dinner that would be original and exciting. No more apricot jam for me. I would amaze family and friends with my creations. For more details www.atkins-diets-recipes.com But no matter what I tried in subsequent years nothing was quite as good as the old turkey recipe with its apricot jam. It had become part of our family’s traditional Christmas cooking. So I gave in and everyone was much happier, even me.

However good a cook you are and whatever new recipes you may attempt in the rest of the year Christmas is a time to come back to traditional Christmas cooking whatever that might be for you and your family. There is a profound wisdom in that which cooks too easily forget. When we cook we are engaging in one of the great acts of social ritual. We are not just cooking for ourselves we are cooking for other people. Our Christmas dinner table expresses not just our skill but our human relationships. Traditional Christmas cooking encapsulates all those relationships, gathered over the years, with people still living and people long since dead that go into making us what we are. At Christmas ghosts sit down at out tables. Traditional Christmas cooking makes sure they are happy ones.

An Insight Into Different Types of Coffee Makers

Here I will help you explore some of the most common coffee maker types, as well as some coffee makers that are truly for the coffee crazy. I have tried to cover some of the benefits of using different coffee brewers depending on your personal needs.

If you lead a busy life and your always on the go a single cup maker maybe just the answer to keep up to your active lifestyle. There are one cup makers available that deliver a mug of hot brew that you make and take with you. Most brew quickly through the lid into a thermal mug and shuts off automatically when done.

A single cup maker is an ideal gift for commuters, college students, professionals always on the go, newlyweds or the single java drinker household. Benefits from a single cup coffee maker include a perfect cup of freshly brewed hot coffee in a flash. Excellent for the office or dorm, you can also make hot water for tea, hot chocolate or instant soups. The k-cup coffee system made by Keurig has it’s own formula for brewing a fresh single serving . It consists of a single portion of ground beans in a container with a filter built-in.

Thermal coffee makers are another option as we all strive to have our brew remain hot and fresh, most of the companies that produce thermal makers claim that you will have up to 4 hours of hot fresh coffee. I have a thermal maker and while it is true that the brew is still warm after a fashion I prefer to start over as I prefer to have fresh java, but my wife loves it.

If you are not as picky as I am then perhaps a thermal coffee maker is right for you. There are a wide variety of options as far as color and size, one of the benefits is the ability to bring and place the crafe at the dinning room table while you entertain your guests.

Space saver coffee makers are a great way to make your small kitchen bigger. Most manufactures make an under counter maker that can give you more space on your counter tops and it offers a great alternative to smaller makers like the single cup makers that we discussed earlier or 4 cup makers. Most all of them have a removable water reservoir that makes filling more efficient and prevents spills and cleaning the reservoir is much easier. You can still get your 10 or 12 cups that you require while keeping your kitchen less cluttered. Excellent for galley kitchens or apartment size kitchens and RV owners.

The French press , also known as a press pot, coffee press, coffee plunger or cafetière, is a brewing device popularized by the French. Its operation is simple and can produce a stronger pot of coffee than some other types of java makers. The press pot consists of a narrow cylindrical container usually made of glass or clear plastic, equipped with a lid and a “plunger” also made of metal or plastic, which fits tightly in the cylinder and which has a fine wire or nylon mesh acting as a filter which can be cleaned and reused.

The java is brewed by placing the coffee and water together, leaving to brew for a few minutes, then depressing the plunger to trap the grounds at the bottom of the container. Because the grounds remain in direct contact with the brewing water and the grounds are filtered from the water via a mesh instead of a paper filter, java brewed with the French press captures more of the brews flavor and essential oils, most of these are generally trapped in the paper or wire filters we use in the drip method of brewing. Because the used grounds remain in the drink after brewing, French pressed coffee should be served immediately so as to not become bitter. A typical 8-cup French press is considered expired after 20 – 25 minutes as there is no warmer plate as in many makers.

Beans for use in a French press should be of a consistent, coarse grind. The use of a hand coffee grinder or manual coffee grinder gives a more consistent grind than the whirling blade variety of electric grinders. The ground should be more coarse than that used for a drip coffee filter, as a finer grind will seep through the press filter and into the coffee. A French press is also more portable and self contained than other makers. And make a great solution for a travel maker in such cases as back packing or camping. Despite the name, the French press is not noticeably more popular in France than in other countries. In most French households, coffee is usually prepared by drip brewing, using an electric coffee maker and paper filters.

A vacuum maker brews coffee using two chambers where vapor pressure and vacuum produce brew which is clean, rich and smooth compared to other brewing methods. This type of maker is also known as vac pot , siphon or syphon coffee maker and was invented by Loeff of Berlin in the 1830s. These types of makers have been used for more than a century in many parts of the world.

The chamber material can be pyrex, metal or plastic, and the filter can either be a glass rod, or a screen from cloth, paper or nylon. The Napier Vacuum Machine, presented in 1840, was an early example of this technique. While vacuum makers are generally to complex for everyday use, they were prized for producing a clear brew and were quite popular until the middle of the twentieth century.

The idea of a vacuum coffee maker is to heat water in the lower vessel of the brewer until the expansion forces the water through a narrow tube into an upper vessel that contains the coffee grounds. When the lower vessel has more or less emptied itself and enough time has elapsed, the heat is removed and the resulting vacuum will draw the brewed beverage through a strainer back into the lower chamber from which it can be stored. The device must usually be taken apart to pour into a mug.

The Spirit of Coffee – Coffees of the World

Ever wonder where the coffee beans in your morning coffee come from? You probably know words like Arabica and Robusta in terms of taste, but did you know that these words can also tell us where those coffees were grown? Here is a look at three of the world’s best specialty coffees and the regions in which they originated. Read on to discover the rich history of these coffees.

Yemen Arabian Mocca

Grown in the mountainous region of Sanani in south Yemen at an altitude in excess of 4,500 ft, Arabian Mocca is the world’s oldest cultivated coffee, distinguished by its richness and full body with chocolate undertones. Yemen is on Asia’s Arabian peninsula, a stone’s throw from Africa. Since there are no other Arabian coffees, it is classified as part of the family tastes of North African coffees.

It is here that the term “mocca” was coined. Its correct spelling is Mokha, for the port city that Yemen coffees ship from. Yemen’s arid climate contributes to the production of one of the best-loved specialty coffees that led Europeans to fall in love with coffee many centuries ago.

Yemeni coffee is one of the most distinct and prized coffees in the world. It’s been called a “wild” or natural cup, earthy, complex, pungent — to some it may be strange and bitter. This coffee can also be characterized as dry, winey, and acidic with chocolate and fruit undertones, rustic flavors, and intense aromas.

(Source: http://www.sweetmarias.com/coffee.arabia.yemen.html)

Mexico “Spirit of the Aztec”

The state of Veracruz produces many average coffees in its low-lying regions, but atop the tall mountains near the city of Coatepec an excellent Arabica bean coffee called Altura Coatepec reigns. The word Altura itself means “high grown”. Altura Pluma indicates the finest coffee of Mexico. Coetepec, a coffee district of Veracruz, provides particularly outstanding coffee beans. Mexican Altura beans have a full medium body, fine acidity, a wonderful bouquet and a satisfying flavor that is mild and sweet. This fine Mexican coffee is noted for delivering a consistently smooth taste and fragrant flavor with good body, depth, and overall balance. It is likely one of the most underappreciated coffees around.

Mexican coffee botanists celebrate Mexico’s highest altitudes (with their approximately one hundred species of Arabica coffee plants) as the finest region of all the world’s gourmet coffees. An inferior grade of coffee bean known Robusta grows at lower altitudes. Mexico itself produces huge quantities of these unremarkable coffee beans, often utilized as dark roasts, supermarket coffees and beans for blending.

Arabica coffee arrived in Mexico at the start of the nineteenth century from the West Indies. Today, Mexico ranks among the world’s top coffee exporters. Most Mexican coffee is processed by the wet method to ensure better acidity and body. Mexican coffee is graded based on the altitude where it is grown. The plantations of Veracruz account for 60 to 70 percent of the Mexican coffee crop. Approximately 5 million bags of coffee a year originate in Mexico. Most of the better beans are grown on large plantations in the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas, and Guerrero. These are producers of “high-grown” Altura Coatepec coffees, among the finest coffees grown in the Americas.

Their flavor is light and nutty with medium acidity and a mild, well-balanced body. With a fine chocolate tang and a hint of sweet undertone beneath the finish, these coffees make an ideal beverage for those of us who enjoy a smooth, mellow-tasting brew that is not overpowering. Altura’s smoothness produces many loyalists of the coffee drinkers who sample it. Mexican Altura Coatepec is an incredible morning coffee, as it could be used in a blend to tone down accompanying fuller-bodied coffees, or better yet, alone for the pure regional flavor.

(Source: http://www.coffeeuniverse.com/world_coffee_latin.html)

Java “Dutch Estate”

As a synonym of coffee, “java” introduced itself in the seventeenth century when the Dutch began cultivating coffee trees on the island of Java (part of the islands of Indonesia) and successfully exported it globally. Often the standard by which all other coffees are measured, Java’s finest golden beans are roasted to yield a piquant aroma, displaying an exquisite acid balance, a heavy body with chocolate undertones, and a lighter finish than Sumatran.

At one time the island of Java was ruled by sultans and dominated by mysticism. The early Dutch settlers who came in the late 17th century found Java to be a wonderfully diverse place with high mountains, thick tropical rain forests and a sultry climate that revolved around the monsoon rains. The Dutch and the Javanese settled the coastal volcanic plains, while much of the interior of the island was left to the jungle and a few tribal groups. The Dutch found that coffee grew very well in this climate, and began to set up plantations around their initial foothold in Batavia (modern day Jakarta). Initially Arabica coffees were planted, but many of these were killed by the coffee rust plague that devastated the region in the 1800’s. Robusta was the logical replacement — a tough plant resistant to many diseases.

Eventually the Dutch plantation owners conquered Java and took on the elements. Large plantations were established in the east of the island, as well as in Central Java and the west. After the Japanese occupied Java in the 1940’s many of these plantations were destroyed or absorbed back into the jungle with their owners imprisoned by the Japanese. After the war and the ensuing independence struggle, many of the larger plantations ended up under the control of the government. Today the big Java plantations (such as Nusantara XII) are still government-owned. However there are many medium and smaller growers who produce excellent quality Arabica beans. These coffees are known as “Government Estate” Java. They are primarily produced at 4 old farms (Kayumas, Blawan, Djampit, Pancoer). The Government body grows about 85% of the coffee in East Java, close to Bali on the Ijen area. The range of altitudes suitable for coffee production is 3,000 to 6,000 feet, with most growing in the plateau region at 4,500 feet.